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Malignant melanoma associated with chronic once-daily aspirin exposure in males: A large, single-center, urban, US patient population cohort study from the “Research on Adverse Drug events And Report” (RADAR) project

Published:March 27, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2018.03.031
      To the Editor: Conflicting evidence exists for the risk of malignant melanoma (MM) subsequent to chronic aspirin exposure.
      • Curiel-Lewandrowski C.
      • Nijsten T.
      • Gomez M.L.
      • Hollestein L.M.
      • Atkins M.B.
      • Stern R.S.
      Long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decreases the risk of cutaneous melanoma: results of a United States case-control study.
      • Gamba C.A.
      • Swetter S.M.
      • Stefanick M.L.
      • et al.
      Aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk among postmenopausal Caucasian women: the Women's Health Initiative.
      • Jeter J.M.
      • Han J.
      • Martinez M.E.
      • Alberts D.S.
      • Qureshi A.A.
      • Feskanich D.
      Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and risk of skin cancer in the Nurses' Health Study.
      Although a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology demonstrated that chronic aspirin exposure before and after MM diagnosis in a large midwestern US population was associated with overall prolonged survival,
      • Rachidi S.
      • Wallace K.
      • Li H.
      • Lautenschlaeger T.
      • Li Z.
      Postdiagnosis aspirin use and overall survival in patients with melanoma.
      the risk of MM subsequent to chronic aspirin exposure remains uncertain. The aim of this study, which was also conducted within a large midwestern US patient population, was to determine whether there was a detectable risk for MM after 1 year or more of chronic aspirin exposure.
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      References

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        • Nijsten T.
        • Gomez M.L.
        • Hollestein L.M.
        • Atkins M.B.
        • Stern R.S.
        Long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decreases the risk of cutaneous melanoma: results of a United States case-control study.
        J Invest Dermatol. 2011; 131: 1460-1468
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      Linked Article

      • Aspirin use and the risk of malignant melanoma
        Journal of the American Academy of DermatologyVol. 80Issue 1
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          To the Editor: “Daily aspirin dose ‘doubles risk of skin cancer in men,’” reported the Daily Telegraph.1 A Google search for “aspirin and melanoma” in June 2018 yielded several similar links from news outlets and medical trade publications, all pointing to an article in press by Orrell et al2 that was recently published in the Journal. Are these alarming headlines justified by the study?
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