The role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in rosacea: A 3-year follow-up

      To the Editor: We read with interest the review by Two et al
      • Two A.M.
      • Wu W.
      • Gallo R.L.
      • et al.
      Rosacea: part I. Introduction, categorization, histology, pathogenesis, and risk factors.
      that reports the microorganisms known to trigger or worsen rosacea such as Demodex folliculorum, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Helicobacter pylori, and Bacillus oleronius with no mention of the role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).
      • Parodi A.
      • Paolino S.
      • Greco A.
      • et al.
      Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in rosacea: clinical effectiveness of its eradication.
      • Weinstock L.B.
      • Steinhoff M.
      Rosacea and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: prevalence and response to rifaximin.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment
      AAD Member Login
      AAD Members, full access to the journal is a member benefit. Use your society credentials to access all journal content and features
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Two A.M.
        • Wu W.
        • Gallo R.L.
        • et al.
        Rosacea: part I. Introduction, categorization, histology, pathogenesis, and risk factors.
        J Am Acad Dermatol. 2015; 72: 749-758
        • Parodi A.
        • Paolino S.
        • Greco A.
        • et al.
        Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in rosacea: clinical effectiveness of its eradication.
        Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008; 6: 759-764
        • Weinstock L.B.
        • Steinhoff M.
        Rosacea and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: prevalence and response to rifaximin.
        J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013; 68: 875-876
        • Wilkin J.
        • Dahl M.
        • Detmar M.
        • et al.
        Standard grading system for rosacea: report of the National Rosacea Society Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea.
        J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004; 50: 907-912
        • Powell F.C.
        Clinical practice: rosacea.
        N Engl J Med. 2005; 352: 793-803
        • Gravina A.G.
        • Federico A.
        • Ruocco E.
        • et al.
        Helicobacter pylori infection but not small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may play a pathogenic role in rosacea.
        United European Gastroenterol J. 2015; 3: 17-24
        • Culp B.
        • Scheinfeld N.
        Rosacea: a review.
        Pharmacy and Therapeutics. 2009; 34: 38-45
        • Van Zuuren E.J.
        • Kramer S.
        • Carter B.
        • Graber M.A.
        • Fedorowicz Z.
        Interventions for rosacea.
        Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011; 16: CD003262

      Linked Article

      • Rosacea
        Journal of the American Academy of DermatologyVol. 72Issue 5
        • In Brief
          Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects approximately 16 million Americans. Four distinct subtypes of rosacea have been recognized, with transient and nontransient facial flushing, telangiectasia, and inflammatory papules and pustules being among the more commonly recognized features. Although the exact pathogenesis of rosacea is unknown, dysregulation of the innate immune system, overgrowth of commensal skin organisms, and aberrant neurovascular signaling may all have a role in promoting the clinical features of rosacea.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF