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The role of cannabinoids in dermatology

Published:April 14, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.02.056
      Twenty-eight states currently allow for comprehensive public medical cannabis programs, and this number continues to grow.

      State Medical Marijuana Laws: National Conference of State Legislatures, 2016. Available at: http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/state-medical-marijuana-laws.aspx. Accessed March 23, 2017.

      Approximately 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the United States use it for medical purposes.
      • Compton W.M.
      • Han B.
      • Hughes A.
      • Jones C.M.
      • Blanco C.
      Use of marijuana for medical purposes among adults in the United States.
      Numerous studies have investigated its uses for chronic pain, spasticity, anorexia, and nausea. In recent years, researchers have also investigated its use for the treatment of dermatologic conditions including pruritus, inflammatory skin disease, and skin cancer.

      Key words

      Abbreviations used:

      CB1 (cannabinoid 1), CB2 (cannabinoid 2), PEA (palmitoylethanolamide), THC (tetrahydrocannabinol)
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      References

      1. State Medical Marijuana Laws: National Conference of State Legislatures, 2016. Available at: http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/state-medical-marijuana-laws.aspx. Accessed March 23, 2017.

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      Linked Article

      • Response to: “The role of cannabinoids in dermatology”
        Journal of the American Academy of DermatologyVol. 77Issue 3
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          To the Editor: We recently read with interest the timely review article “The role of cannabinoids in dermatology” by Mounessa et al.1 Cannabinoids may have the potential to treat a variety of cutaneous inflammatory diseases, and we applaud the authors for their groundbreaking piece. Not addressed in this article, however, were potential negative consequences of cannabinoid use for skin diseases. Additionally, it is important to distinguish between endogenous cannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and phytocannabinoids.
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