Advertisement

Response to: “The role of cannabinoids in dermatology”

      To the Editor: We recently read with interest the timely review article “The role of cannabinoids in dermatology” by Mounessa et al.
      • Mounessa J.S.
      • Siegel J.A.
      • Dunnick C.A.
      • Dellavalle R.P.
      The role of cannabinoids in dermatology.
      Cannabinoids may have the potential to treat a variety of cutaneous inflammatory diseases, and we applaud the authors for their groundbreaking piece. Not addressed in this article, however, were potential negative consequences of cannabinoid use for skin diseases. Additionally, it is important to distinguish between endogenous cannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and phytocannabinoids.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment
      AAD Member Login
      AAD Members, full access to the journal is a member benefit. Use your society credentials to access all journal content and features
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Mounessa J.S.
        • Siegel J.A.
        • Dunnick C.A.
        • Dellavalle R.P.
        The role of cannabinoids in dermatology.
        J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017; 77: 188-190
        • Klein T.W.
        Cannabinoid-based drugs as anti-inflammatory therapeutics.
        Nat Rev Immunol. 2005; 5: 400-411
        • Kupczyk P.
        • Reich A.
        • Szepietowski J.C.
        Cannabinoid system in the skin—a possible target for future therapies in dermatology.
        Exp Dermatol. 2009; 18: 669-679
        • Telek A.
        • Biro T.
        • Bodo E.
        • et al.
        Inhibition of human hair follicle growth by endo- and exocannabinoids.
        FASEB J. 2007; 21: 3534-3541

      Linked Article

      • The role of cannabinoids in dermatology
        Journal of the American Academy of DermatologyVol. 77Issue 1
        • Preview
          Twenty-eight states currently allow for comprehensive public medical cannabis programs, and this number continues to grow.1 Approximately 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the United States use it for medical purposes.2 Numerous studies have investigated its uses for chronic pain, spasticity, anorexia, and nausea. In recent years, researchers have also investigated its use for the treatment of dermatologic conditions including pruritus, inflammatory skin disease, and skin cancer.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • In reply
        Journal of the American Academy of DermatologyVol. 77Issue 3
        • Preview
          To the Editor: We would like to thank Drs Liszewski and Farah for their thoughtful response to our recent publication.1 We certainly agree that cannabinoids function in a complicated manner. Like many medications, they may have adverse effects that health care providers and patients should consider. Liszewski and Farah highlight several possible negative consequences of cannabinoid use reported in the literature, including proinflammatory chemotaxis in cell culture models and reduction in human hair growth.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF