Skin color in dermatology textbooks: An updated evaluation and analysis

Published:April 23, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.04.084
      To the Editor: The US population is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse, yet medical textbooks have not reflected this change. A study of general medicine textbooks showed minimal skin type diversity, with 4.5% of images showing dark skin.
      • Louie P.
      • Wilkes R.
      Representations of race and skin tone in medical textbook imagery.
      In dermatology, visual diagnosis and pattern recognition are affected by the background skin type. Previous work showed limited representation of skin of color in dermatology textbooks.
      • Ebede T.
      • Papier A.
      Disparities in dermatology educational resources.
      We aimed to update and evaluate any changes in the representation of skin phototypes in core dermatology texts used to educate trainees, dermatologists, and generalists.
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